Gleason Ledyard gets encouragement

Christian and Missionary Alliance
Christian and Missionary Alliance (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Gleason met his wife, Kathryn  he knew right off, that she was the right one but when he proposed, he added a condition:   Would she be willing  to live in an igloo?

Kathryn took 19 weeks to think about that one and  she concluded   she  preferred   living  with  him  in an igloo to living  than with anyone  else in a mansion.   Thus  a missionary   partnership   was born that  would  last  for many  years.

Gleason  and Kathryn   spent  fifteen years  of ministry  among the Eskimos  in the Canadian   Central  Arctic. Traveling  in a ski or float- equipped   airplane    or by dogsled,   sleeping   for  months   in  igloos, enduring   severe  sub-zero  temperatures,    they took the good news to many  Eskimos  for the first  time. Their  trips  could cover 5,000 miles from their  base  on the west coast of Hudson  Bay. God brought  them safely through   whiteout   flying conditions,  blizzards  on the ground, raging   storms   on the  water,   and  two plane  crashes.

The  exciting story of this ministry  period is presented   in Eskimos (new hardcover edition)  by Gleason  Ledyard,  published in Canby,  Oregon by Christian   Literature International published in  1999.

After  fifteen years  of pioneer  work, others  came to continue  their  work and  Gleason  and Kathryn   felt that the could leave  the Arctic for another ministry.  Their  first new assignment   was a survey  and report  of the diversified  home missions  operations  of the Christian  and Missionary Alliance.

During   some  of their  visits  to Indian   reservations,    they became  concerned  the Indians  were not fully understanding   some of the difficult  biblical  words,  and  they  needed   a simpler  translation     of Scripture.   The Ledyards   thought   something   should  be done, but at this  time  they  did not see this  as a task  for themselves but hoped that they would find something that would meet their need.

When the survey  was completed  and  the Ledyards  felt the tug to get back to their primitive   ministries in the Canadian British  Columbia, so they obtained   a four-wheel-drive   truck  and  camper.  They then traveled  over a wide area  for several  months, but it seemed to them they could not find their niche.  What was wrong?

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